Developing an Open Educational Resource on Encryption

Encryption works. Properly implemented strong crypto systems are one of the few things that you can rely on. Unfortunately, endpoint security is so terrifically weak that NSA can frequently find ways around it.

— Edward Snowden, answering questions live on the Guardian’s website

Society needs an educational resource, covering the complex topics involved with information encryption, that is modular, openly accessible, and freely remixable. This is my proposal to create such a resource.

Open Educational Resources (OER) are freely accessible, openly licensed documents and media that are useful for teaching, learning, educational, assessment and research purposes. The development and promotion of open educational resources is often motivated by a desire to curb the commodification of knowledge[1] and provide an alternate or enhanced educational paradigm.

Utilizing Creative Commons licensing, an OER can be created on oercommons.org, where it will be maintained by a single authority, yet anyone in the world will be able to adapt and create their own work from ours. Oercommons.org provides a long-term support platform for maintaining these resources.

I started publicly asking for help in June of 2013–and I received a very warm welcome. You don’t have to look far to see why.

2013-06-24

August 2013:

2013-08-23 2013-08-23-2

October 2013: KEYNOTE: Journalism in the Age of Surveillance, Threat Modeling: Determining Digital Security for You, [For Journalism] Keeping Under the Security Radar, Improving Your Digital Hygiene

December 2013: United We Stand — and Encrypt by Josh Sterns2013-12-21

December 2013: Arab journalists need training for civil unrest and wars — referencing the CPJ’s Journalist Security Guide

January 2014: A Modest Proposal for Encrypting the Work of Activists by Kate Krauss

2014-01-20

It is clear that a diversity of educational resources are needed. While my original proposal was going to be supported by the United States Open Knowledge Foundation, OKFNUS has since back peddled due to lack of support from central-OKF. I am hoping that the many people behind Crypto.is are interested in spearheading the development of this OER. If they are not, and no other organization is, I will shortly be registering my own domain name to create a project launch page.

The initial launch of the OER can be created using Micah Lee‘s work, of the Freedom of the Press Foundation, Encryption Works: How to Protect Your Privacy (And Your Sources) in the Age of NSA Surveillance. Micah and the Freedom of the Press Foundation graciously licensed this work as CC-BY, allowing us, and even Wikipedia to reuse the work with attribution. I am hoping that Micah, himself, will want to be included in this project.

The target audience, initially, will be journalists, whistle blowers, activists, and dissidents. While these groups are the extreme, their example proves useful for the rest of society.

Please comment on this post, or tweet me, or email me your feedback.

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